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China’s ‘dockless’ bike sharing could be coming to a street near you

China’s ‘dockless’ bike sharing could be coming to a street near you

Companies roll in the U.K, the United States and beyond, to disrupt existing programs with their colorful fleets of bicycles that do not require docking stations.
One of China’s biggest Mobike operators, he has unveiled his 1000 orange bicycle wheels in the rainy English city of Manchester Thursday, marking his first foray out of Asia.

“Manchester will be a springboard for Europe,” said Chris Martin, head of international business expansion.

His great rival, Ofo, arrived in Europe first, launching a small fleet of bright yellow bikes in the English university city of Cambridge in April.

OFO also quietly bicycles in Silicon Valley and San Diego tested.

Bicycling sharing has become a global company with nearly 1,000 operations spread all over the world. The industry should be worth up to 5.9 billion in 2020, according to a report released last year by research firm Roland Berger.

Analysts say the Chinese model is an element of change. Bikes can be locked and unlocked anywhere through a smartphone application, which means users do not have to send them to the designated stations.

The rapid spread of this approach across China has already raised issues that include abandoned mountain bike and prostate companies.

After expansion in other Asian cities last year, Chinese bicycle starts are ready to take the West.

“We are very serious about international expansion,” said Zhang Yanqi, Ofo’s business manager.

“The last mile problem for travelers in the city is a global problem to solve,” he said.
The popularity of China’s bicycle sharing was carried out by users who take walks by the so-called “last mile” of their trip, the office subway station, for example.

Currently operates in 130 cities, mainly in China, and plans to increase this number to 200 by the end of the year, which is mainly extended more foreign places. The company wants to show that its bicycle exchange model “is global,” Martin said.

While they are struggling for customers, the two companies offer attractive prices for rides. After paying the deposit of between 200 and 300 yuan ($ 29- $ 44), users can get on a bicycle for only 1 yuan (15 cents). In Manchester, the Mobike walk will start at 50 pence (65 cents).

Although low-priced rides raise questions about the fact that the business model is sustainable, some observers say Mobike and Ofo can go a long way with their current momentum.

“If you have a hyper adoption, you have a consumption phenomenon,” said Jeffrey Towson, a private equity investor and professor at Peking University. “You can understand how to make money in the future.”

Companies roll in the U.K, the United States and beyond, to disrupt existing programs with their colorful fleets of bicycles that do not require docking stations.

One of China’s biggest Mobike operators, he has unveiled his 1000 orange bicycle wheels in the rainy English city of Manchester Thursday, marking his first foray out of Asia.

“Manchester will be a springboard for Europe,” said Chris Martin, head of international business expansion. His great rival, Ofo, arrived in Europe first, launching a small fleet of bright yellow bikes in the English university city of Cambridge in April.

OFO also quietly bicycles in Silicon Valley and San Diego tested. Related: the case of the inevitable triumph of bicycles in cars The sharing of bicycles has become a global company with about 1,000 operations scattered around the world.

The industry should be worth up to 5.9 billion in 2020, according to a report released last year by research firm Roland Berger. Analysts say the Chinese model is a game changer.

Bikes can be locked and unlocked anywhere through a smartphone application, which means users do not have to send them to the designated stations.

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